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Chuo’s Competency Program Selected by METI

The 30 Courses for Cultivating Fundamental Ability in Working Professionals (sponsored by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI)) is a program which, from the perspective of promoting the cultivation of fundamental ability in working professionals as part of university education, seeks to award the good practice of universities that implement effective cultivation and to broadly share information. From among 189 applications for the program, Chuo University's "Software Project on CG, VR and Image Processing (the Rubric-based Competency Development Program, Department of Information and Systems Engineering Course Group)" was selected, and the news was released on the METI website on Monday, March 3, 2014. A ceremony and special symposium were held on Sunday, March 10.

As a modern interpretation of Chuo University's founding spirit of fostering the ability to apply knowledge to practice, our school has thoroughly examined the behavioral attributes, or competencies, which can be acquired through education and which are shared by individuals who perform at a consistently high level in global society. We have also clarified competencies required of Chuo University students. Based on this understanding, our entire university works to promote the cultivation of competency, including expertise, through a series of regular curriculum courses and extracurricular activities which are known as a program for studying Knowledge×Behavioral Attributes. These numerous actions were selected for the Good Practice Program, a competitive support program sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

Project-based Software Project on CG, VR and Image Processing 1 to 4

The Rubric-based Competency Development Program was the motivation for the various projects at Chuo University. As the core of this system, the Department of Information and Systems Engineering established the Video Contents Engineer Program in 2009. This program aims to develop video contents engineers who are proficient in computer graphics (CG), virtual reality (VR), image processing, information security, etc. At the same time, the department implements Software Project on CG, VR and Image Processing 1 to 4, which use a project format and is conducted during the second term of second year students, the first and second terms of third year students, and the first term of fourth year students.

For example, in Software Project on CG, VR and Image Processing 4, students produce futuristic games that can be effectively played on 3D display walls for the naked eye. Students use OpenGL and experience all aspects of game creation including actual coding (promotion videos). When deciding the game contents and program specifications, students divide into teams of about 5 people to brainstorm and consult with each other (example of past games). This leads to the discussion for various opinions regarding the type of the game, functions to be added, etc. Every year, all of the teams are impassioned regarding their developments. For details, refer to page 41 of the public documentation (page 56/148 of the PDF).

30 Courses for Cultivating Fundamental Ability in Working Professionals

From the perspective of promoting the cultivation of fundamental ability in working professionals within university education, the METI has established the 30 Courses for Cultivating Fundamental Ability in Working Professionals (METI homepage) in order to award the good practice of universities which conduct effective cultivation and to broadly share information. From among more than 180 diverse applications for the program, the aforementioned Software Project on CG, VR and Image Processing (the Rubric-based Competency Development Program, Department of Information and Systems Engineering Course Group) was selected together with projects from schools including the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Mechano-Aerospace Project A), Osaka University Graduate School (Internship-on-Campus) and Nihon University (Program for Road Building and Bridge Maintenance Through Collaboration with Students and Community Members).

[Fundamental Ability 30 Awards] Excerpt from application guidelines

In addition to the 3 fundamental abilities of working professionals and the 12 ability elements, screening items for the 30 Courses for Cultivating Fundamental Ability in Working Professionals shall broadly include projects implemented by each university to cultivate the abilities required to perform in society. In particular, in view of increasing globalization, we shall actively recruit programs which cultivate the ability to succeed in global society.

Awards in past years

Prior to the start of the 30 Courses for Cultivating Fundamental Ability in Working Professionals, Chuo University's Rubric-based Competency Development Program was selected as a "particularly outstanding project for which a ripple effect is expected" (also known as GP within GP), and also won the 2012 Engineering Education Awards (Achievement Section) from the Japanese Society for Engineering Education.

Compatibility with scholastic ability and fundamental ability in working professionals

The Department of Information and Systems Engineering and the information and systems engineering academic major (graduate school) indicate levels for each competency item in order to supplement the MEXT's Scholastic Ability (listed on p. 12 of the main text entitled "Toward Construction of Scholastic Curriculum Education" which was submitted by the Central Education Council, an advisory institution to the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) (MEXT homepage) and the METI's Fundamental Ability in Working Professionals (listed on pp. 12-14 of the main text entitled "Midterm Summary" which was presented by the Research Council on Fundamental Ability in Working Professionals, which is a private research group of the Director of the Economic and Industrial Policy Bureau (METI homepage). Furthermore, the department and major incorporate a variety of special features for systematically cultivating competency in all classes.

A Global Specialist is one type of professionals envisioned in the cultivation of global professionals by Chuo University. For the competencies expected of a Global Specialist and the relationship between scholastic ability and fundamental ability in working professionals, please see the level of each competency item envisioned for the scholastic ability and fundamental ability in working professionals in the table at about one-fifth of the way down the page introducing competencies.

As estimated in this table, in addition to the concepts referred to by scholastic ability and fundamental ability for working professionals, Chuo University also clarifies the diversity that is a real requirement of globalization. This new viewpoint is also suggested by the following item "screening items...shall broadly include projects...in view of increasing globalization, we shall actively recruit programs which cultivate the ability to succeed in global society" which is listed in the application guidelines for the Fundamental Ability 30 Awards.

When working in teams which include foreign students, instead of simply accepting the diversity originating from each member's background, the team utilizes that diversity for creating new value. As appropriate for students studying scientific technology, the project-based classes Software Project on CG, VR and Image Processing 1 to 4 allow students to achieve and create contents with their own hands. In addition to education officials from Japan and overseas, the classes are also open to personnel officials from corporations.

Diversity

The diversity is a real requirement of globalization. This ability is composed of identity, harmonization, and synergy (see next section). For example, in global society, even an individual who possesses outstanding superficial specifications may fall into a negative way of thinking if he or she lacks identity--wondering "What is the reason for me to become No. 1 in the world?" If the individual lacks harmonization, he or she may fall into national isolation or a dangerous form of nationalism. If the individual lacks synergy, he or she will be unable to form a win-win relationship in business, and the maintenance of world peace and the global environment will also be nothing more than a fantasy. Competency cultivation education in the Department of Information and Systems Engineering and the information and systems engineering academic major (graduate school) constantly focus on global conditions and value diversity.

Diversity

Definition: While responding appropriately to diversity (culture, customs, values, etc.), increase one's own presence and collaborate to create a synergistic effect for obtaining new value.

Level 0
Problematic Behavior: Fails to recognize diversity (culture, customs, values, etc.).
Level 1
Passive Behavior (level during a summer season of 1st year): Recognizes and attempts to understand diversity (culture, customs, values, etc.).
Level 2
Normal Behavior: Understands and accepts diversity (culture, customs, values, etc.). A certain level of results is achieved in collaboration with multiple individuals, although results comparable to the number of people are not achieved.
Level 3
Autonomous Behavior (level at the time of graduation): Understands and accepts diversity (culture, customs, values, etc.). Also, conveys one's own familiar culture, customs, values, etc. In collaboration with multiple individuals, results comparable to the number of people are achieved.
Level 4
Creative Behavior: Achieves a mutual understanding of diversity (culture, customs, values, etc.) and responds appropriately. At the same time, acts based on comprehensive judgment of one's own goals and the expectations of others. In collaboration with multiple individuals, achieves a synergistic effect.
Level 5
Emergent Behavior (level after the completion of graduate school): Heightens one's own presence while responding appropriately to diversity (culture, customs, values, etc.). Achieves a synergistic effect from collaboration and obtains new values.
Identity

Definition: Based on a correct understanding of familiar culture, customs, values, etc., acts based on judgment of one's own goals and the expectations of others.

Level 0
Problematic Behavior: When encountering different culture, customs, values, etc., fails to recognize one's own familiar culture, customs, values, etc.
Level 1
Passive Behavior (level during a summer season of 1st year): Recognizes and attempts to understand one's own familiar culture, customs, values, etc.
Level 2
Normal Behavior: Correctly understands one's own familiar culture, customs, values, etc.
Level 3
Autonomous Behavior (level at the time of graduation): Correctly understands one's own familiar culture, customs, values, etc. Acts based on judgment of one's own goals and the expectations of others.
Level 4
Creative Behavior: Based on a correct understanding of one's own familiar culture, customs, values, etc., acts based on judgment of one's own goals and the expectations of others.
Level 5
Emergent Behavior (level after the completion of graduate school): Based on a correct understanding of one's own familiar culture, customs, values, etc., acts based on judgment of one's own goals and the expectations of others, thus heightening one's own presence.
Harmonization

Definition: Achieves a mutual understanding of different culture, customs, values, etc., responds appropriately, and continues to engage in mutual learning.

Level 0
Problematic Behavior: Fails to recognize the existence of different culture, customs, values, etc.).
Level 1
Passive Behavior (level during a summer season of 1st year): Recognizes and attempts to understand different culture, customs, values, etc.
Level 2
Normal Behavior: Understands and accepts different culture, customs, values, etc.
Level 3
Autonomous Behavior (level at the time of graduation): Understands and accepts different culture, customs, values, etc. Also, conveys one's own familiar culture, customs, values, etc.
Level 4
Creative Behavior: Achieves mutual understanding of different culture, customs, values, etc. and responds appropriately.
Level 5
Emergent Behavior (level after the completion of graduate school): Achieves a mutual understanding of different culture, customs, values, etc., responds appropriately, and continues to engage in mutual learning.
Synergy

Definition: Obtains new value through a synergistic effect born from the collaboration of multiple diverse (culture, customs, values, etc.) individuals.

Level 0
Problematic Behavior: Despite collaborating with multiple diverse (culture, customs, values, etc.) individuals, has a negative effect.
Level 1
Passive Behavior (level during a summer season of 1st year): Fails to achieve results despite collaborating with multiple diverse (culture, customs, values, etc.) individuals.
Level 2
Normal Behavior: A certain level of results is achieved in collaboration with multiple diverse (culture, customs, values, etc.) individuals, although results comparable to the number of people are not achieved.
Level 3
Autonomous Behavior (level at the time of graduation): Multiple diverse (culture, customs, values, etc.) individuals collaborate and achieve results comparable to the number of people.
Level 4
Creative Behavior: Multiple diverse (culture, customs, values, etc.) individuals collaborate and achieve a synergistic effect.
Level 5
Emergent Behavior (level after the completion of graduate school): Multiple diverse (culture, customs, values, etc.) individuals collaborate and achieve a synergistic effect, thus obtaining new value.

Please refer to the competency introduction page for information on other competencies.